SDCC’s Glanzer Tells NBC News Their Policy Is Sufficient – sounds proud of it!

Comic-Con Criticized for Not Protecting Women in Costume

Geeks for Consent have launched a petition to demand Comic-Con 2014 organizers create a detailed anti-harassment policy

Last night San Diego Comic Con’s public relations rep was interviewed by NBC news in San Diego about their firm stance that their anti harassment efforts are sufficient. Despite the internet backlash against that stance when expressed in his interview with Comic Book Resources last week, a thorough break down by The Mary Sue of the flawed logic SDCC is using to justify ignoring the needs of the women and LGBTQ folks who attend Comic Con, and generous amounts of tumblr and twitter outrage at SDCC — Glanzer has not budged, and continues to defend their efforts – which involve ZERO training of their volunteers, NO publicizing of their anti harassment policy, and a policy itself that is more vague than both the pets policy and the weapons policy.

A previous volunteer gave us the volunteer manuals from 2012 and 2013, the past two conventions, and they do not mention the harassment of guests, they do not mention what a volunteer should do if someone tries to report harassment, they do not mention any policy or procedure for enforcing the harassment policy. The packet doesn’t even mention that they have an anti-harassment policy. The volunteers are also not trained in what to do if someone is harassed. We’ve created resources to streamline the training of volunteers — even a quick form for them to fill out when someone reports harassment so that they know what to ask and how to be supportive, even if they didn’t have a full training. But San Diego Comic Con IS NOT INTERESTED in any of these efforts to improve their policies.

Watch the interview for yourself (above), sign the petition, and vocalize your discontent with the hashtag #SDCCFAIL. Note: in both interviews, it is clear that Glanser hasn’t even bothered to read the petition or respond to the specific requests.

Do not let them silence our voices. Telling thousands of people that their gender-based concerns about public safety are not worth hearing is what creates a culture where people feel free to grope, assault, and verbally and sexually harass. San Diego Comic Con may be happy to create an environment where those people are told their behavior is acceptable — but we as a community need to demand better. Together, let’s recreate convention spaces as harassment free fan zones where we celebrate our differences, instead of making each other feel unwelcome and unsafe.

For more info, and examples of harassment at SDCC, and cons who are doing right, read Heidi McDonald’s post at Comic Beat from this morning.