Male Allies talk Cosplay =/= CONsent on Matty P Presents: Saturday Morning Cereal

“This is everybody’s job. We’re talking about what we’re proud to be, in a culture of inclusion. It’s supposed to be a safe zone, where women feel safe to dress up.”

Male allies at Matty P’s Radio Happy Hour step up and call each other to action. Together we can make conventions safer, more inclusive places where we all feel welcome to celebrate our favorite characters and stories!

Discover Entertainment Internet Radio with Matty Ps Radio Happy Hour on BlogTalkRadio

Listen in (above link) as male allies talk about what we need to do as culture to shift our geekdom into a safer, more inclusive space. Hint: it’s on the men to step up as allies, too!  (The extensive discussion of Cosplay =/= CONsent and SDCC is the last segment of the radio hour.)

They talk about how they view the harassment and groping from a man’s perspective, and how some men must not have been taught how to treat other people as they were growing up.

“the problem is, is that when, in our minds we objectify the women that we see, we see them less of people, more as objects. We steal their humanity, we don’t give them credit as a person. Then all of the sudden, we can touch them. We can take pictures. That’s what some people are doing! Unwanted pictures, all the way to groping, and unwanted physical harassment. It’s making people, vast majority are women, feel unsafe!”

They also discuss what the petition is asking for, (a more specific policy that is publicized so people know it  exists, and volunteers who are equipped to actually handle reports when harassment happens) — and how inadequate SDCC’s current policy is: “What this petition is aiming to do is have the management of comic con be more specific. …There are 1-2 sentences buried in the 200 page handbook. And apparently they don’t talk to the volunteers about what to do if they see somebody cross the line. With the lack of policy, there becomes a lack of responsibility on behalf of hte management.”

They call out SDCC management for worrying about any potential bad press instead of acting when they know unequivocally the current consequence of their policy is that at least 2,000 people don’t feel safe or protected by the current policy.

“They point out a certain reticence for management to move forward. It doesn’t matter what your worries for the future are if at the moment anyone at the moment doesn’t feel safe, you are failing at your job in enforcing [the harassment policy].”

And, as allies they acknowledge that they have not lived this experience of being harassed or groped, and they may never truly understand what it feels like, but that doesn’t stop them for finding it to be a completely unacceptable and unwelcome component to geek culture and within convention spaces.

“Ideally you don’t want signs up everywhere at comic con having to spell this out, eventually, a generation or two from now, to say “You actually had to put signs up?” I don’t mind being the generation laughed out a few generations down the line if it eliminates the problem.”

Not here, not now. We don’t want this. A couple blocks down the way, a storm trooper and a troll in line at a starbucks, and a gorgeous woman down the way dressed as a fairy. I want to do everything I can to keep these doors open, and make everyone feel welcome. This is about feeling and acting on that passion. Harassment goes against that, puts a big wall in front of it, is exclusionary. These divide us, and we don’t want it here.

Thank you two, for having our backs and for speaking up as allies. And thank you for doing and saying more than SDCC is willing. We as a culture can definitely change things from within, we just need more people to stand up and demand better — and that means male allies standing beside the cosplayers as we make those demands.