Harassment Policy for Geek Girl After Party 2015

 The 2015 GeeksForCONsent Geek Girl After party Saturday May 9 is dedicated to providing a harassment-free conference experience for everyone, regardless of gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, age or religion. We do not tolerate harassment of party guests in any form. Guests violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the party at the discretion of the organizers.
 
Harassment includes verbal comments that reinforce social structures of domination (related to gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, age, religion); sexual images in public spaces; deliberate intimidation; stalking; following; harassing photography or recording; sustained disruption of talks or other events; inappropriate physical contact; and unwelcome sexual attention. Guests asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately.
 
If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the conference organizers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the party. If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of conference staff immediately. Party staff can be identified by their GeeksForCONsent buttons.
 
Party staff will be happy to help participants contact venue security or local law enforcement, provide escorts, or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe for the duration of the conference. We value your attendance.
Dudes are welcome to join our space, but be aware that this is not an opportunity to flirt with other attendees. Be mindful of how much space you are taking and how you could be impacting the fun of others around you. If you are found to be making other attendees uncomfortable, we won’t hesitate to kick you out!

Comikaze’s anti-harassment policy, thorough and publicized! (Los Angeles, 10/31-11/01/14)

Comikaze has been doing a great job with their anti-harassment efforts. The convention has been advertising their stance on “Cosplay =/= CONsent” since the Spring, and has always been vocally anti-harassment. This year, in the weeks leading up to the convention, they’ve been posting their policy and posters on social media in anticipation of the convention.

From Facebook:

hey friends #cosplaynotconsent remember the rules when you want to take a photo with a fellow attendee . Just a friendly reminder that we do not tolerate harrasment of any kind at #comikaze. Please read our Harrasment Policy on our site. Please report any incidents ASAP . If you are found to be doing something CREEPY we will remove you.http://comikazeexpo.com/harassment-policy #Comikaze14

Their harassment policy clearly defines how to report harassment with staff and volunteers trained to take reports seriously. And the policy defines parameters for people who don’t have the common sense telling them not to harass.

And these are the large (fun!) posters that will be at the convention space:

 

Their approach goes to show that we don’t need to take down the fun, celebratory mood in order to do a good job setting boundaries for convention spaces. If you go to the convention, let us know how it was! We are definitely bummed to be missing it this year! If you are there, use hashtags #Comikaze and #Comikaze14 to share stories and pics!

Gamergate 2014: Online harassment of women in gaming

Cross-posted from PBS NewsHour (youtube), originally aired on October 16, 2014.

“Members of the gaming community launched a campaign in August called Gamergate as a response to allegations of unethical journalism. But it has grown to include outright threats against women who work in or critique the industry. Hari Sreenivasan talks to one of the targets of the harassment, Brianna Wu of Giant Spacekat.”

SDCC Volunteer (2012): Harassed as a volunteer, no training, no protection

Cross-posted from ElfGrove’s tumblr, originally posted in 2012.

So I was assigned a 4 hour shift (as opposed to the three hour shifts outlined in the volunteer info, fuck you SDCC — one day I’ll learn my lesson to not work for this con). I was assigned to the “Fulfillment Room” — which needs to change it’s name very badly. There was the opportunity to work in the room, exchanging tickets for prizes from panels or vouchers for volunteer/staff shirts or standing in the hallway holding a sign pointing to the room and yelling to direct people. I did not volunteer to work in the hallway, but got stuck out there because other people wouldn’t and someone who had fucking skipped all the way to the room suddenly had a “bad knee” and couldn’t stand for long periods. Damn my near-inability to lie.

The organizer people were nice enough for the first couple of hours, sent folk out to give us brief breaks for the restroom, and brought me a granola bar around noon since I was scheduled where lunch fell right in the middle of my long shift. Then they seemed to forget we were out there. They stopped sending people out to let us take bathroom breaks occasionally (not a big deal for me, but other volunteers had to abandon post a couple of times). I only got off shift when I saw multiple people from my shift who had been working in the room leave, and they were leaving late. I had to just abandon post and go back to the room and simply tell them I was leaving. They got new volunteers in and didn’t bother to dismiss the prior shift. Yeah, standing in a hall for 4 and a half hours yelling at crowds and being harassed by skeevy dudes is my idea of fun. Asshats.

Speaking of skeevy dudes. When someone is obviously on assignment to stand in a certain spot in a hall holding a sign and yelling at the crowds, their lack of ability to leave is not an invitation to keep hitting on them when they don’t initially respond to you. This wasn’t just me, another girl who was on the same assignment further down the hall was getting harassed so badly she briefly left her post to talk to me and make sure she wasn’t alone with the harassing dudes and so she could disappear until that particular group moved on. Skeevy dudes. “Fulfillment Room” does not have an unspoken “Sexual” in front of it, and especially the one dude sidling up to within less than six inches of me to whisper that you didn’t have a ticket but you wanted “Fulfillment” and surely I could give it to you right there right now anyways is so incredibly creeper-tastic I have no words. I try to sidle away, and this shithead follows me. There are no other staffers in sight, and his group of 3 male friends are standing off to the side watching and grinning. I’m on-duty, practically a captive audience, have to be polite because I am representing the con, have no back-up, and you are a foot taller than me. GO FUCK YOURSELF CREEPER. None of you are being unique, creative, or clever with that “Sexual Fulfillment Room” BS — which several clearly thought they were. I heard it more times than I could count.

Also, a lot of people were really upset that they couldn’t just walk in there and get free stuff without a redemption ticket. Like I can change the rules for you. The sticker says “Volunteer On Duty” — I do not have decision-making power. Even if I did, why would I change the rules just for your unique snowflake ass?

P.S. “Fulfillment” no longer sounds like a real word by the way.

EDIT: The big issues here was the total lack of information on what the volunteers could/should do when faced with sexual harassment and the not relieving the volunteers on duty when their shift was up. Standing in one spot and yelling for 4 hours is far from comfortable, and it should not have turned into four-and-a-half hours because no one could be bothered to manage the volunteers after the first 2 hours.

We were only given direction of where to stand, what to yell, not to abandon our post under any circumstances, and not to lean against the wall or sit down (even if there were chairs nearby). The staff surely know that this sort of shit happens, and they should either not send females out to stand by themselves or should have told us what to do if it got as bad as it did (Mr. Less-Than-Six-Inches-Of-Personal-Space).

The stupid comments don’t phase me so much. I’m a cosplayer, so you learn to deal. The guy invading my personal space and asking for sexual favors (while he had back-up and I did not) was beyond the deal-able norm for me. I was more concerned for the younger (clearly a minor) girl down that hall that panicked enough to seek refuge with me for a couple of minutes.

EDIT 2: Since this post is being referenced by an SDCC harassment article, a few updates. Please see follow ups to this post here, here, here (note that my friend and I both emailed and never received a response from the convention), and here.

I find it alarming that SDCC has no publicly posted harassment policy, and that the only training volunteers receive is one unlabeled page in a general orientation email attachment sent months before the con and is never mentioned again. (This is the 2013 edition.) Fun exerpts:

All harassment complaints should be documented in writing and submitted within twenty-four (24) hours, or as soon as it is possible.

All submitted complaints will be promptly and thoroughly investigated and appropriate action will be taken. The investigation will be as objective and complete as reasonably possible. Upon completion of the investigation, a determination will be made and the results will be communicated to the complainant, the alleged harasser and, as appropriate, to all others directly concerned.

If inappropriate conduct is proven, prompt and effective remedial action will be taken.

You must submit any reports of harassment in writing within 24 hours and wait an undetermined amount of time to see if they decide you have sufficiently proven that something bad happened. Then they will take unspecified “appropriate action”. This achieves nothing in regards to non-staff or non-volunteer harassment cases as the attendee harassers will be gone and not care and there is no hint that anything will actually be done save for the victim of harassment will be subject to as much scrutiny as the perpetrator.

Since there will inevitably be the question of “what were you wearing?” What a person is wearing is never EVER an invite nor justification to harass. You’re human beings and I expect you to exert the same self-control over your libido that I am am expected to do so over mine. That said, I was not dressed particularly provocatively, nor should it have made a difference if I were [see photos]. I am still a sentient fellow human being.

I have a history since 2006 with SDCC, as attendee and volunteer, there has never been a year when I was not sexually harassed at this con, and I cannot make that same comment of any of the several other cons I attend every year. #SDCC

SDCC’s Glanzer Tells NBC News Their Policy Is Sufficient – sounds proud of it!

Comic-Con Criticized for Not Protecting Women in Costume

Geeks for Consent have launched a petition to demand Comic-Con 2014 organizers create a detailed anti-harassment policy

Last night San Diego Comic Con’s public relations rep was interviewed by NBC news in San Diego about their firm stance that their anti harassment efforts are sufficient. Despite the internet backlash against that stance when expressed in his interview with Comic Book Resources last week, a thorough break down by The Mary Sue of the flawed logic SDCC is using to justify ignoring the needs of the women and LGBTQ folks who attend Comic Con, and generous amounts of tumblr and twitter outrage at SDCC — Glanzer has not budged, and continues to defend their efforts – which involve ZERO training of their volunteers, NO publicizing of their anti harassment policy, and a policy itself that is more vague than both the pets policy and the weapons policy.

A previous volunteer gave us the volunteer manuals from 2012 and 2013, the past two conventions, and they do not mention the harassment of guests, they do not mention what a volunteer should do if someone tries to report harassment, they do not mention any policy or procedure for enforcing the harassment policy. The packet doesn’t even mention that they have an anti-harassment policy. The volunteers are also not trained in what to do if someone is harassed. We’ve created resources to streamline the training of volunteers — even a quick form for them to fill out when someone reports harassment so that they know what to ask and how to be supportive, even if they didn’t have a full training. But San Diego Comic Con IS NOT INTERESTED in any of these efforts to improve their policies.

Watch the interview for yourself (above), sign the petition, and vocalize your discontent with the hashtag #SDCCFAIL. Note: in both interviews, it is clear that Glanser hasn’t even bothered to read the petition or respond to the specific requests.

Do not let them silence our voices. Telling thousands of people that their gender-based concerns about public safety are not worth hearing is what creates a culture where people feel free to grope, assault, and verbally and sexually harass. San Diego Comic Con may be happy to create an environment where those people are told their behavior is acceptable — but we as a community need to demand better. Together, let’s recreate convention spaces as harassment free fan zones where we celebrate our differences, instead of making each other feel unwelcome and unsafe.

For more info, and examples of harassment at SDCC, and cons who are doing right, read Heidi McDonald’s post at Comic Beat from this morning.

Awesome Con Awesomely Tackles Convention Harassment

Sexual harassment and groping at comic conventions is a serious problem that has received increased attention in recent months. Awesome Con, a crowdfunded, by-the-fans, for-the-fans convention, responded to reported harassment at their first convention last year by creating an anti-harassment policy and procedures for dealing with harassment, training their volunteers, and partnering with GeeksForCONsent to provide an in-house, trauma-informed team to provide resources to attendees.

Unlike harassment in public spaces, conventions are private events. There are rules in place, and they should extend to include and address harassment. GeeksForCONsent (affiliated with HollabackPHILLY) is a safe haven for victims of convention related harassment to build community and organize to influence conventions to improve and enforce anti-harassment policies. Read more

“Reporting Harassment at a Convention: A First-Person How To”

Cross-posted from John Scalzi, originally published June 2013.

 

My friend Elise Matthesen was creeped upon at a recent convention by someone of some influence in the genre; she decided that she was going to do something about it and reported the person for sexual harassment, both to the convention and to the person’s employer. And now she’s telling you how she did it and what the process is like. Here’s her story.

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We’re geeks. We learn things and share, right? Well, this year at WisCon I learned firsthand how to report sexual harassment. In case you ever need or want to know, here’s what I learned and how it went.

Two editors I knew were throwing a book release party on Friday night at the convention. I was there, standing around with a drink talking about Babylon 5, the work of China Mieville, and Marxist theories of labor (like you do) when an editor from a different house joined the conversation briefly and decided to do the thing that I reported. A minute or two after he left, one of the hosts came over to check on me. I was lucky: my host was alert and aware. On hearing what had happened, he gave me the name of a mandated reporter at the company the harasser was representing at the convention. Read more